Pain in Spain

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Keynote at the Congreso Fisio 2018

IX UMH Physiotherapy Congress 2018, Alicante

There were several remarkable things about the UMH Physiotherapy Congress in Alicante last week, which I will share below. Before though, I want to state that without doubt, the organisers created a meeting that universities around the globe should seek to emulate. This was a conference that was professionally co-ordinated, filled to the brim with great and varied content, smoothly run, and was attended by an enthusiastic, passionate, sizeable group of 420 professionals and students. The success emerged from the co-ordinated efforts of many individuals, in particular Sergio Hernández Sánchez, Ellana Mckerrell and Roser Bel-lan Roldán.

I was delighted to be asked to speak to over 400 people at the main conference and then run a Pain Coach Workshop for professionals. This was an opportunity to share some of the latest thinking about the global problem of pain, and ideas about how we can go about driving social change together. On reviewing the statistics, it appears that the chronic pain numbers are slightly lower in Spain compared to the rest of Europe (16.6% and 20% respectively). Despite the mild difference, this still represents a major public health issue that needs urgent attention, with the costs estimated at 1.5% of GDP.

“The pain in Spain is mainly on the plain”

This was a conference of the highest quality. The topics, the speakers, the logistics, and the atmosphere were second to none. And what is so remarkable is that the conference was planned, organised and run by the physiotherapy students from UMH. This was as professional as it could be, and therefore the Congreso was a great success as far as I was concerned.

The Pain Coach Workshop was an UP (Understand Pain Social Enterprise) offering, allowing me to work with twenty five professionals who were keen to build on their knowledge and skills for chronic pain. The participants kindly shared their experiences and insights about chronic pain in Spain, and together we worked through a ‘lite’ version of the Pain Coach day.

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Pain definitions from the 5 minute challenge

With a handful of English speakers, we had a fantastic translation team, who really made the workshop happen. They were brilliant as we got into the rhythm of exchanges. In the three hours we looked at the vehicle of coaching as a means to deliver skills and knowledge, together with always seeking to get the best from both the individual and the clinician. From there, we considered a range of practices including those that seek to build wellness, address sensorimotor adaptations, reduce threat and sensitivity and to encourage people to live their best lives, whatever their circumstances. The emphasis of the Pain Coach is upon realising the choices we have in life and how we make the best ones to achieve success and results. The philosophy that runs through the programme is based upon knowledge, wisdom, and compassion.

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Translation in action at The Pain Coach Workshop

This was an important trip for several reasons. Firstly to make new friends in Spain so that we can build upon the successes and create future events that benefit individuals and society. Secondly, we have identified a need that we can meet together with education, encouragement and enablement at both the undergraduate and professional levels. And thirdly, we can tap into the passion that was so clearly expressed in the opening ceremony by Roser and Sergio, to move forwards in a positive and productive way.

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For information about keynotes and Pain Coach Workshops, please contact us: painphysiolondon@gmail.com

UP Workshop in society for society

Richmond Stace ~ Specialist Pain Physiotherapist & Pain Coach
Richmond Stace

On Monday I will be delivering an Understand Pain Workshop in Newport. This is one of the UP social initiatives, whereby when I run a Pain Coach Workshop for clinicians and other professionals, I the run one for the people locally for free. It is a 1 for 1 model.

There are several avenues that I am pursuing to drive social change and a new understanding of pain: The Pain Coach Workshops for clinicians, Understand Pain Workshops for the people in society, and 2 free places for local undergraduates at each Pain Coach Workshop (see some recent comments by a student about the day).

Both the workshops and my clinical work is informed by the latest thinking in pain science and associated fields, delivering the pinnacle of understanding in a practical way. As with any problem, when we understand it, it is no longer a problem but something we must transform using tools that work. As an example, last week I spent 3 days in the company of some of the greatest contemporary thinkers about consciousness and life. Pain is arguably the best example of a conscious experience, and hence understanding this is a key aspect of understanding pain. For those of you who are interested, this included Dan Dennett, Karl Friston, Andy Clark and Anil Seth. In the room though, were many brilliant brains (whole people!).

Brilliant brains!

The basis of a workshop is that people leave with practical skills and a working knowledge of pain so that they can go about implementing and integrating these into their life. I am an avid believer in living life as a main purpose. What I mean by this is that many people suffering chronic health and pain will put their lives on hold and await a change. The science and I argue that the way to get back to living, it to actually get out there and live. Of course there are ways to do this and the purpose of the workshop is to show people how they can; emphasis always on the word ‘can’.

It is worth noting that the Newport workshop (call 01633 820321) is for anyone suffering chronic pain. There are also specific workshops for conditions, for example complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). There is a CRPS workshop on Tuesday in Bath — see here

You can keep up to date on events and read blogs and tips by following me on Facebook (click on the ‘like’ button), Twitter and signing up to my blog here.

Whether you are a clinician who works with people in pain, a professional such as a lawyer or case manager, a patient or carer, I hope to see you soon!

RS