Getting the best of Christmas

5 top tips if you suffer chronic pain

If you are suffering chronic pain, here are 5 tips to maximise your festive spirits and joy. You can decide upon your approach and give it your best by following some simple principles.

1. Make a plan

What is your picture of success? How do you want Christmas to be? What can you focus on that would make it memorable for the right reasons?

The questions we ask ourselves, we will always answer. So, make sure you come up with ones that self-encourage, helping you to focus on what you want, rather than what you do not want.

Think and act like the person you want to be

Make a plan each day, prioritising the key moments, punctuating them with rest and recovery time. You can share your plan with those you’ll be sharing the day with so that everyone is on board. Of course, the best plans do not always turn out the way we want, so we need to be flexible. However, if we try to stick to it in the best way that we can, often made easier by writing it down, then we are doing all that we can to be successful.

2. Motion is lotion

This is a way of nourishing your body (tissues — muscles, joints, tendons etc.). The key is to be consistent through the day. In essence, the movement is ‘pumping’ blood and hence oxygen into the tissues as well as removing the build up of toxins (that cause sensitivity).

The brain is embodied, and needs movement to survive — the brain needs a body. Pretty much everything that we do requires movement. Anything that gets in the way of the movements necessary to meet our needs will raise the perceived threat value. As many readers will know, pain is well-related to perception of threat and the state of the person, and poorly related to the tissue state.

Move to groove >>> any movement is a good movement!

A simple way of using ‘motion is lotion’ is to move and change position every 15-20 minutes, and then stand up and move around every 40-60 minutes. These are ball-park figures and it is important to work out your own need for movement. Further, you may like to use prompts and reminders until this becomes a habit.

3. 3 breaths

As often as you can remember (use reminders for this as well), stop and pay attention to three full breaths. Notice the moment when you first breathe in, the sensations in your body, and as you breathe out, the sense of letting go.

Attention is one of the skills of being well. A famous study was entitled, ‘the wandering mind is an unhappy mind’; in other words, the more we can pay attention to what is really happening, the happier we feel. Paying attention to your breath is a simple way to develop this skill.

Notice how you relax and muscles ‘let go’ as you breathe out. This is because on the out-breath, the parasympathetic nervous system is more active. This branch of the autonomic nervous system is responsible for all the important healthy functions behind the scenes: digestion, sleep, energy, anti-inflammatory activity and more.

5/5 breathing >>> count slowly to 5 as you breathe in, and count slowly to 5 as you breathe out. Continue for a minute or two, or longer

We have no direct access to our biology. It is in the dark, so to speak. However, there are one or two things we can choose to take control over to an extent. Breathing is one, with all the benefits that come with the innumerable practices that have been ‘breathed’ over the centuries.

A further use of the 3 breaths is when you feel tense, pain, frustrated, angry, upset or any other emotional state. Notice how when you pay attention to the breath, those feelings ease. This is because you have stopped fuelling them with the thoughts.

4. Meaningful connections

We need each other. We are design to connect and share and be generous. Have you noticed how your feelings change when you do something for someone else, no matter how small or insignificant that it may be? In fact, it is the little things, consistently, that make the difference, especially in a relationship.

How great does it feel to be with people who care about you, and you care about? Notice how that feeling builds when you pay attention to it (re-read the bit on attention above if necessary). Become aware of those great feelings and sensations in your body when you merely think about a special person.

Even when you don’t know the person you are encountering, can you make the connection meaningful by passing the time of day, and smiling? Of course you can! This can become the way you do it; your style.

Watch other people interact, share and be kind to each other. You will change state and feel it. Pay extension.

One way of connecting is by touch. Again, by design we have a system dedicated to light touch that is a direct way of soothing another, showing care and concern and evoking a healthy biological response. This is also a simple way for a partner to share a moment with you.

The key to feeling the effects, is to be present. This is the only moment, right now…it’s gone, and here is another…gone, and so on. Being present means that you can pay attention to what is actually happening, rather than being embroiled in the mind’s wanderings. To be present is also a skill to practice.

5. Smile. Just because you can

Notice what happens when you bring on a gentle smile. A soft upturn of the corners of your mouth. You can choose to tie this in with the now well-known practice of gratitude. The (biological) state of gratitude is one of the healthiest and an ‘antidote’ to suffering states.

Before the practice, it is important to acknowledge that all states are normal and part of the spectrum of feeling states. We need all of these states of course, as they communicate a need.

What are my needs right now? This is a great thinking tool, as you step back from being caught up in it all, and realise what it is that you need to do in this moment: move, breathe, eat, re-frame a thought etc.

What are my needs right now?

To practice gratitude is to become aware of something in your life that you are grateful for. There are many things that we can chose. Of course, whether they become apparent depends on your mood. A handy mantra here is: for a good mood be grateful, in a bad mood be graceful.

Practice: think of a moment in your life when you felt truly grateful for something. Focus your full attention on this memory, re-living it using all your senses, noticing which senses amplify the feelings. Is it the sights, the sounds, the feel? As you continue to focus on the feelings as they arise in your body, notice how they build.

Moment to moment noticing of things to be grateful for and those that bring you joy is a practice; a skill. For instance, you can decide to approach the day by looking out for things that make you laugh or smile. Then you practice.

The fact of the matter is simple in principle. The challenge is to keep focused and pay attention to what is really happening in the face of the many distractions. It is to realise that we live out a story that can appear to have been written for us. There’s some truth here in as much as we are fed beliefs from a young age, many of which are wrong, yet can limit us as we grow. Realising that you do not have to continue with the same story if it is full of suffering, is the first step to moving onward. Many don’t realise their potential, feeling that somehow, this is it. Not true. Is it time for a new story for you?

What will be your story from now?

And so, what will be your approach? How are you going to do Christmas? How are you going to do life? What is your picture of success? What principles must you follow each day to get those little wins on the way forward? Make a plan, get the right support and encouragement around you, and go for it. Each person is a miracle when you think about how we came into existence and how we are designed to grow and serve a purpose.

Merry Christmas.

Pete and I

Sharing a purpose

Pete and I share a passion and a purpose. We discovered our shared purpose over a number of conversations at dinners and conferences. More recently Pete and I recorded our chats, ‘pain talking’ (see here, here and here) to share our thoughts. There will be more to come, much Moore!

Our purpose: to change the way people and society thinks about pain. Why? Read on…

Pete Moore and Richmond Stace Pain Toolkit and The Pain Coach
Richmond Stace (The Pain Coach) & Pete Moore (The Pain Toolkit)

Today Pete is giving the Sir Michael Bond lecture, an annual British Pain Society event. The talk is unsurprisingly titled: Pain self-management; first choice or last resort? Punchy and to the point, as is Pete. And this is what the pain world, which is in fact the whole world with pain being a ubiquitous experience owned by only the first person, needs to jolt the right actions.

Pete and I could be considered outspoken, disruptive and bringers of change. However, not everyone is comfortable with change. We meet resistance. Not so long ago I spoke to a large group of mainly doctors, presenting some of the latest thinking in pain. The feedback was a fascinating mix of love and hate. Clearly some were hankering after change, recognising that the current predominant model has failed. One who only had courage with his or her feedback form accused the thinking as snake oil. I would love that person to sit in front of the likes of Karl Friston, Andy Clark, Mick Thacker and try to run with that argument!

But this is the reality. We have clinicians practicing old ways that refuse to change their thinking. This is of great concern as the millions across the globe continue to suffer (needlessly) as a result of the misunderstandings of pain. The situation must change: this is the purpose of Pete and I.

Self-management and coaching

Pete has been working tirelessly to engage clinicians and pain sufferers. He shows them that self-management is the way forward using his own story and The Pain Toolkit. An important principle that we must all adhere to is that only the person can ease their own suffering.

Whilst there can be a role for medication and intervention when chosen with good reason and used wisely, the main thrust should always be the person’s understanding of pain and what they do themselves. As I say to each person I see, you are with you all the time so you must be able to coach yourself with clarity and calm to take the best actions.

To understand pain is always the start point. The true insight into the cause of one’s own suffering unlocks the door of potential. This is why Understand Pain exists as a means to deliver the knowledge, skills and know how to society. At UP we have the vision of a world that understands pain. This would mean a huge reduction in suffering, more money available for other social concerns, people would know what to think and do, and treatment would be about encouragement of wise actions by the person.

Getting the best of people

It is always the person who suffers pain (not the body part) and hence we must think about the person and their life. And this is why The Pain Toolkit and Pain Coaching are successful in encouraging and inspiring people to live as a means to managing and overcoming their pain. Waiting for the pain to go before getting back to living just does not work. There is only this moment to take action, right now. The future never comes, so if you are waiting, it will be a long one!

Pete Moore and Richmond Stace
Richmond Stace and Pete Moore

 

Coaching and specifically Pain Coaching seeks to get the best of the person by giving them practical and working knowledge of pain. The focus is upon the person’s picture of success and how we get there step by step. All too often people think that they must just cope, get by, live with it etc. Of course, if this is your best hope then this is all that will be achieved. This is not the fault of the people. It is the problem in society — pain is a social problem. When society changes its thinking, the actions will change. Pete and I: this is our work. And we will keep going, encouraging people to understand, to use tools and practices each day and to build momentum towards a better life.

Today Pete will speak frankly. He will be entertaining, because he is, but he will hit the mark with the fact that self-management is the key ingredient. Without this there is little chance of progress.

I am thrilled that Pete has this opportunity. He deserves the stage and will undoubtedly make an impact. I will try to get there early and get a front row seat! Pete, can I wear a Liverpool shirt?

Oh, and we also both love rock n roll….

Pain in Spain

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Keynote at the Congreso Fisio 2018

IX UMH Physiotherapy Congress 2018, Alicante

There were several remarkable things about the UMH Physiotherapy Congress in Alicante last week, which I will share below. Before though, I want to state that without doubt, the organisers created a meeting that universities around the globe should seek to emulate. This was a conference that was professionally co-ordinated, filled to the brim with great and varied content, smoothly run, and was attended by an enthusiastic, passionate, sizeable group of 420 professionals and students. The success emerged from the co-ordinated efforts of many individuals, in particular Sergio Hernández Sánchez, Ellana Mckerrell and Roser Bel-lan Roldán.

I was delighted to be asked to speak to over 400 people at the main conference and then run a Pain Coach Workshop for professionals. This was an opportunity to share some of the latest thinking about the global problem of pain, and ideas about how we can go about driving social change together. On reviewing the statistics, it appears that the chronic pain numbers are slightly lower in Spain compared to the rest of Europe (16.6% and 20% respectively). Despite the mild difference, this still represents a major public health issue that needs urgent attention, with the costs estimated at 1.5% of GDP.

“The pain in Spain is mainly on the plain”

This was a conference of the highest quality. The topics, the speakers, the logistics, and the atmosphere were second to none. And what is so remarkable is that the conference was planned, organised and run by the physiotherapy students from UMH. This was as professional as it could be, and therefore the Congreso was a great success as far as I was concerned.

The Pain Coach Workshop was an UP (Understand Pain Social Enterprise) offering, allowing me to work with twenty five professionals who were keen to build on their knowledge and skills for chronic pain. The participants kindly shared their experiences and insights about chronic pain in Spain, and together we worked through a ‘lite’ version of the Pain Coach day.

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Pain definitions from the 5 minute challenge

With a handful of English speakers, we had a fantastic translation team, who really made the workshop happen. They were brilliant as we got into the rhythm of exchanges. In the three hours we looked at the vehicle of coaching as a means to deliver skills and knowledge, together with always seeking to get the best from both the individual and the clinician. From there, we considered a range of practices including those that seek to build wellness, address sensorimotor adaptations, reduce threat and sensitivity and to encourage people to live their best lives, whatever their circumstances. The emphasis of the Pain Coach is upon realising the choices we have in life and how we make the best ones to achieve success and results. The philosophy that runs through the programme is based upon knowledge, wisdom, and compassion.

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Translation in action at The Pain Coach Workshop

This was an important trip for several reasons. Firstly to make new friends in Spain so that we can build upon the successes and create future events that benefit individuals and society. Secondly, we have identified a need that we can meet together with education, encouragement and enablement at both the undergraduate and professional levels. And thirdly, we can tap into the passion that was so clearly expressed in the opening ceremony by Roser and Sergio, to move forwards in a positive and productive way.

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For information about keynotes and Pain Coach Workshops, please contact us: painphysiolondon@gmail.com

A story of learning

Funny colorful signpost to different countries around the world

This patient wanted to share her story to inspire others. She travelled to London from her country in Africa to find answers to her pain problem.

Overcoming a pain problem requires understanding that informs practices you use each day, through the day, whilst living life the best way you can. In other words, you may have parameters to work to right now, but these will grow as you develop and build wellness, together with the specific exercises and strategies you use to get better. It is a learning process. Nothing happens in isolation as we are all on a timeline with what is happening now impacting upon the next moment and so on.

Many people do not realise or actualise their potential. We have much more ‘say’ in what happens than is commonly thought. Understanding, awareness, patience and compassion are all key ingredients for gathering insight into what is really happening now, the best actions to take and how to carve out a way onwards that is meaningful.

This is the work of overcoming pain by addressing the needs in ourselves and our lives concurrent with building wellness (resilience, outlook, attention and generosity).

Here are her words:

Hi everyone, my story begun in October 2016. I woke up one morning partially ready to go to work and I noticed a slight pain in my butt, I thought nothing of it and went to work. The next day I was limping but I still ignored the pain because I had a lot of things to take care of at work. What would they do without me in the office? duh… absolutely nothing. The pain kept increasing and within a week I was paralyzed by pain and completely immobile. The pain was so severe in my left leg that moving any other part of my body (eyes and mouth excluded) caused excruciating pain, so I had to lie still. I still get emotional thinking about the day I was taken to the hospital, because the pain was so bad I had several blank moments I fought against because I didn’t want to faint and cause more injury. It was tough but we made it to the hospital eventually.

At first the doctors thought I was suffering sciatica but after a couple of days they saw that the medication did absolutely nothing for me except put me to sleep for long hours. So, I started a series of tests, blood tests, scans, x-rays and MRI all of which were very traumatizing because of the pain and the village it took to help me from one point to the other. Eventually I was diagnosed with transverse myelitis. It was a probable diagnosis, they still weren’t sure.

In the beginning of this whole situation I thought it was something that a pill and a day of rest would cure but as time went by and the pain kept increasing I thought death had come for me. yes, I did feel as if I was going to die but I wasn’t ready so I found myself soliloquizing continuously about my dreams and how I was looking forward to the future. I even remember getting upset for a moment at God for giving me all these dreams and then letting death stand in my doorway before I achieved any of those dreams. A whole day of both internal and external positive speech got me to the point of utter believe that no matter what happened I was going to live.

Weeks passed, the pain was more manageable but I was still bed ridden. For someone who is independent and very private; it was quite devastating to lean on people for every single thing. I mean I am extremely grateful for my mother, she was there from the beginning to the end but it was gut wrenching when I couldn’t sit on my own because my back muscles couldn’t hold me up, so I had to be held like a child or when I couldn’t even brush my teeth or feed myself or lay on the bed myself or bathe myself.  Like I said before, I am extremely grateful for everyone that took care of me but it did not change the fact that it was extremely difficult to see myself in that position; but as time went on I learned to see all the little things we all take for granted when we have complete health and accepting help became easier for me but not without the overflow of gratitude for all other things good. Indeed I learnt to be grateful for everything no matter how little, which was very important in my recovery journey.

Four months passed, I was better and using a walker to get around. I was discharged from the hospital but things did not progress further. I almost panicked wondering if I was ever going to walk on my own again but I didn’t allow myself enter that rabbit hole. Eventually my parents brought me to London for further medical treatment, to see if there was anything the doctors back home missed and after another round of tests and scans I was directed to a Rheumatologist and a Physiotherapists (Richmond Stace).

During my first meeting with Richmond Stace I quickly understood that this was not a physical fight; it was more mental than physical. “The fact that there is pain doesn’t mean that there is injury” he said, these words changed my life because from then on I started to try myself. I developed the courage to believe I could not just walk again but run and dance and do everything I loved to do before I became ill. Some days where extremely harder than others but my self- speech helped me through those days. If I had an emotional issue I could not overcome on my own, I spoke to Richmond about it and he would tell me what to do; it made me understand that I didn’t always have to internalize everything but since I’m the kind of person who doesn’t really like talking to others about my innermost thoughts I found a way that always helps and that is journaling. I don’t write every day but I write when I am battling something that won’t just go away; and it helps every single time.

The days went by, I kept doing my exercises and mental imaging, some days I would think I was getting better and others made it look as if I was going back to square one. I read a lot, everything I read was kind of like an expansion of the things that Richmond was teaching me and it was a wonderful blend. The time for us to go back home was near and I was able to take at most five painful steps a day. I remember the day my mother booked our tickets back home, she requested for assistance and it upset me so much because it made me feel as if I was not going to get better before we go back. I was going to go back home still using the walker and nothing was going to change but things did change. Two weeks before we went home, I got up one morning, looked at my walker which was always beside my bed and ignored it without realizing that I was ignoring the thing that helped me get around; I got up with very minimal pains, I walked to the sitting room and never looked back. I screamed for my mum and the moment she saw me walking with only two legs, she fell on the floor and began to cry. It was a very emotional day but all was not over.

I was walking by myself, every one including my doctors where very happy for me but what I did not realize was that I couldn’t jump back into my usual life. Richmond gave me exercises to do but I decided to take the exercises further and I tried to run a short distance. Guess what? I couldn’t run at all. I tried to jump and it was painful as hell. Walking around for more than an hour was so painful I felt like using a walker again. I got very upset because I felt that I was going to look healthy and not be completely healthy. I was still going to need a wheelchair at the airport, look for the elevator or escalator wherever I went. I was so upset that I cried for a whole hour in the bathroom and when I was done I cleaned my tears and did the exercises Richmond told me to do in the first place and I haven’t stopped since.

So, I have come to the end of this long story and these are the lessons I have learnt so far.

1) In all things give thanks

2) Help is good, no man is an island. Accept help and be grateful for it

3) Read, knowledge is power

4) Meditate, it is the best medicine

5) Visualize your health goal

6) Persevere

7) Do what your doctor says especially if your doctor is Richmond Stace

8) Laugh, laugh as hard as you can. It’s better to laugh than to cry

9) Never ask. “Why me?” and if you do, your answer should always be “because I am special and highly favoured”.

Am I able to run now? Nope, am I able to dance? Just a little but I can jump without pain and I can walk for three hours straight without pain. I am not there yet but is anyone ever “there”? and besides what is “there”? Where is “there” anyway? I have come to believe that this life is a journey and as long as I am happy in each moment and doing the things that will improve me then “there” for me is actually now. I hope this encourages you to keep pushing for something better.  Your life is your life, only you can do the things it takes to be better.

Signing out! Anonymous.

UP Workshop in society for society

Richmond Stace ~ Specialist Pain Physiotherapist & Pain Coach
Richmond Stace

On Monday I will be delivering an Understand Pain Workshop in Newport. This is one of the UP social initiatives, whereby when I run a Pain Coach Workshop for clinicians and other professionals, I the run one for the people locally for free. It is a 1 for 1 model.

There are several avenues that I am pursuing to drive social change and a new understanding of pain: The Pain Coach Workshops for clinicians, Understand Pain Workshops for the people in society, and 2 free places for local undergraduates at each Pain Coach Workshop (see some recent comments by a student about the day).

Both the workshops and my clinical work is informed by the latest thinking in pain science and associated fields, delivering the pinnacle of understanding in a practical way. As with any problem, when we understand it, it is no longer a problem but something we must transform using tools that work. As an example, last week I spent 3 days in the company of some of the greatest contemporary thinkers about consciousness and life. Pain is arguably the best example of a conscious experience, and hence understanding this is a key aspect of understanding pain. For those of you who are interested, this included Dan Dennett, Karl Friston, Andy Clark and Anil Seth. In the room though, were many brilliant brains (whole people!).

Brilliant brains!

The basis of a workshop is that people leave with practical skills and a working knowledge of pain so that they can go about implementing and integrating these into their life. I am an avid believer in living life as a main purpose. What I mean by this is that many people suffering chronic health and pain will put their lives on hold and await a change. The science and I argue that the way to get back to living, it to actually get out there and live. Of course there are ways to do this and the purpose of the workshop is to show people how they can; emphasis always on the word ‘can’.

It is worth noting that the Newport workshop (call 01633 820321) is for anyone suffering chronic pain. There are also specific workshops for conditions, for example complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). There is a CRPS workshop on Tuesday in Bath — see here

You can keep up to date on events and read blogs and tips by following me on Facebook (click on the ‘like’ button), Twitter and signing up to my blog here.

Whether you are a clinician who works with people in pain, a professional such as a lawyer or case manager, a patient or carer, I hope to see you soon!

RS

CRPS specific Pain Coach Workshop for people with the condition and their carers

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The next CRPS specific Pain Coach Workshop is coming up in Bath — link at the bottom for tickets (free). We had great feedback from the last workshop, but took note of people’s comments and extended the session. This one is longer so we can really tuck into some of the practices, and have the experience together.

The Workshop is by design a positive experience. We very much focus on what we can do and the choices we can make to lead the best life.

Together with specific practices that are important to address CRPS (and other painful problems), we will be looking at the skills that are known to be key for a healthy life. These skills are the best buffer for life’s challenges and hence play a foundation role in overcoming pain. And that is what we are seeking to do. Not ‘managing’ or ‘coping’, instead overcoming and moving to a new level.

The final part of the session is about how we can implement and integrate the practices into our life so that you can make a plan that you can follow in your world and reality.

I hope to see you there!

Click here for details and tickets

Pain Coach Workshops ~ supporting the next generation of therapists and clinicians

A week ago we had another Pain Coach Workshop. This time in Wilmslow, near Manchester. A great spot with some excellent local cafes. I do love a cafe.

Regular readers will be familiar with the UP story, the UP vision and how we are supporting the next generation of clinicians and therapists by providing two sponsored places for local undergraduates.

Everyone who attends the Pain Coach Workshop brings immense value to the day. Purposely a small group to create a positive dynamic, the team all add their experience and views. In particular I enjoy hearing from the current undergraduates–the openness, freshness and the beginner’s mind that I encourage is evident.

Sam and Emma from Salford University came to the Wilmslow workshop, and here is what Sam had to say:

Here’s what Sam had to say:

I have recently completed the Understanding Pain & Pain Coach Workshop lead by Richmond Stace. I am a physiotherapy student, and was lucky enough to receive a free place that Richmond provides to support local undergraduate development.
I became interested in this workshop due to my time out on placement, in which I was challenged with chronic pain patients. Many patients had been seen by numerous health professions prior to myself, and suffering with pain for many years. I did not feel equipped to deal with this patient group who had deeply established pain belief systems and pain embedded within their lives. I believe as a student, it is important to develop the ability and confidence in which you can challenge a patient’s understanding of pain.

I understood the approach of ‘Making Every Contact Count’ was vital to encourage physical activity and promote behaviour changes that lead to a healthier lifestyle. However, I now feel that the approach of ‘Making Every Contact Count’ needs to extend to pain coaching. The course has provided me with the tools to encourage patients to understand pain and most importantly, gain control over it. This is a skill that will need to be practiced, and as a student it is the perfect time to develop and create change in ourselves, in-order to create change for our patients.

I thoroughly enjoyed this workshop, it was great to share the day with experienced physiotherapists and it was a fun learning experience. Richmond’s passion, values and drive is infectious and I cannot wait to graduate to develop my abilities to encourage, educate and enable change. A big thank you to Richmond for this great learning opportunity and I would encourage all physiotherapy students to attend!

The next Pain Coach Workshop is in Newport on Sat November ~ see here

Much more to come in the 2018!

Workshop for CRPS a great success

Understand Pain & Pain Coach Workshop ~ Bath, 2017

“Thank you very much for today. It was a real privilege to attend”

I was delighted that we filled all the places and had to add several more for the CRPS workshop on Monday. It was an excellent afternoon with a really engaged group, keen to understand and know what they can do to move onward. That is the premise for Understand Pain and Pain Coach Workshops, where we deepen our knowledge of pain so that we can focus on what we CAN to be successful and get results.

This was the first UP & CRPS UK workshop at Royds Withy King in Bath, and based on the demand and feedback, we will be rolling out future dates across the UK. We will also be extending the workshops to a day so that we can have even more experiences of success together. The day is all about taking action and having the experience of what that is like, driving and motivating change in your desired direction.

The popular practices we looked at included the mindful practices that can be used in different ways to create calm, insight and focus, the ‘check in’, and journalising. We followed the way that I do in sessions with people 1:1, starting with the vision, strengths and values. This attunes the person to where they are going and the characteristics they possess to use to get there.  Over the afternoon we covered the key areas:

  • Understand Pain
    • What is pain?
    • The size of the problem of pain
    • CRPS criteria
  • Pain Coach
    • The practices that constitute a lived programme that interweaves into the person’s life, whilst they live their life as a means to overcoming pain — becoming a self coach and a self leader

The three main features of the workshops are simple and digestible:

  1. The model of success ~ how we can be successful
  2. Strengths based coaching ~ how to get the best of you
  3. The pinnacle of our knowledge of pain ~ understand pain to change pain

There is no reason why we can’t address pain, learn, transform, and have fun at the same time!

Here are some more comments:

What did people most enjoy?

  • “being in a space to acknowledge pain, guilt free”
  • “Richmond especially, extremely brilliant way with him”
  • “lovely delivery style”
  • “the way the workshop was presented”
  • “very enjoyable”
  • “good explanations. Simple to understand”
  • “very informative”
  • “I did not expect to be challenged as much as I am now following the workshop — positively”
  • “interactive nature of the event”

Come and join us next time!

Future events driving social change

For release in September ~ In conversation: Rich and Pete talk pain. A series of short videos focusing on the key areas of pain. See Pain Coach and Physiotherapist Richmond Stace + Pain Toolkit’s Pete Moore in relaxed conversation. My aim is to create a community so that we can drive social change via new thinking based on new understanding of pain and the action we must take as a society. This is just the beginning. Join us!

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Understand Pain & Pain Coach Talk ~ Weds 4th October 2017 at The Royal Society of Medicine ~ click here to book

Understand Pain & Pain Coach Workshop for Clinicians and Therapists ~ Thursday 5th October 2017 in New Malden, Surrey ~ click here to book

Probably the best meeting in the World

More reflections on SIP 2017

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You know what it’s like. You realise at the time that you are involved with something important. Then you get home and start thinking ‘wow’, that really was probably the best and most important meeting in the World when it comes to the problem of pain: SIP 2017.

The problem of pain is undoubtedly one of the greatest challenges facing society, and most people don’t even realise. Up to 441 billion Euros is the cost of chronic pain each year. That is an enormous financial burden that does nothing to describe the suffering endured. This can and must change. Attitudes and beliefs in society need a drastic update in line with what we really know about our potential as human beings for fostering change. Out with the old messages, out with interventions and medicines as the way to solely ‘manage’ pain, out with the notion that pain equates to tissue damage. Out, out, out!

“out with the old messages and in with the real understanding of pain. Then society knows that this suffering can ease

It was fascinating and enlightening to hear so many European clinicians and stakeholders talking about people (patients), the importance of healthcare professional education, and even the word coaching was used. In the room were people looking at pain from all angles, a unique blend in the first place. This set the scene for deep discussion, learning and results.

The openness to ideas and modern thinking about pain was refreshing. The people at SIP 2017 want to understand, want to learn and above all want to make a difference. And we can make a difference by persevering and looking at every possible way to change the way society thinks about pain ~ understand pain to change pain.

No single group dominated the meeting. Instead the forum was truly free for each person to contribute and put forward their thinking and experiences. We heard people talk about their pain, and they were able to discuss this with scientists, clinicians and policy makers in an environment created purposefully. It seems that clinicians ‘worry’ about conferences or meeting where people with pain and suffering can speak about their lives. Instead, this should be encouraged and embraced as we get to the bottom of the problem and take real steps forward. How useful is a conference where academics or clinicians speak about cases and research without ant real stories in the room?

“the openness to ideas and modern thinking about pain was refreshing

My intention is to build and cement relationships with other stakeholders across Europe, be involved with the new EU platform, contribute with UP and Pain Coach workshops and take action in line with the vision of UP: a society that understands pain.

SIP statement

‘The European Commission is following SIP’s lead and has launched the EU Health Policy Platform to build a bridge between health systems and policy makers. Among other health policy areas, the societal impact of pain is included as well and will have a dedicated expert group.’

In the UK we must take this example of how we can move forward. Pain is a societal issue and hence we need to hear from all stakeholders, in particular patient representative groups. The lived experience of the person is the basis of what we are working with to overcome pain. We are seeking to change the story so that the person can say: I feel like myself. Change is what people want, defined in their own terms by things that they want to do in their life. We can and must work on a number of levels to achieve this and we can and must be optimistic. Why? Because we are changing every moment, we are designed to change and need to know how.

Our quality of life is determined by how we feel. How we feel is determined by what we are thinking (consciously and subconsciously). What we are thinking is based on our beliefs about the world, and these stem from all the influences in our life. The moment to moment decisions and actions we take through the day shape our life and the ‘rating’ we give to our life. However, there is constant change afoot and we can harness the opportunity this creates by making decisions to commit to a particular pathway. The pathway is determined by the practices chosen in line with a desired outcome. Being determined to be the best you, with a clear vision and being coached to achieve success and long-term results transforms the experience. This is the essence of Pain Coaching.

With 100 million people suffering pain in Europe, 100 million Americans suffering and the rest of the World following the same theme, we must create the conditions for change. This starts with the understanding of pain because when people truly understand their pain, they realise their potential and a way forward. There can be a role for medication and interventions on occasion, but with this being a societal problem, there are many other actions that empower and enable people to overcome their pain. Together we can do this as a modern society. We have the means and with the costs so high, we have the impetus.

RS

Pain Coach Workshop for GPs

Why should GPs understand pain?

Audience Applaud Clapping Happines Appreciation Training Concept

Sat 3rd June Education Morning at New Malden Diagnostics Centre

~ Do you understand pain?

Can you confidently answer these questions:

  • what is pain?
  • what do we currently know about the causes of pain?
  • what can the person in pain do to overcome their pain?

Pain is one of the commonest reasons to seek help. And we are not only talking about back pain or neck pain, instead thinking about all the circumstances and conditions that feature pain. Digging deeper, whilst the pain is unpleasant by its very nature, it is the suffering that drives the act of going to the doctor. We can even take this a stage further and suggest that the causes of suffering result in consulting with the GP. For example, the person who cannot work, cannot play with their children, cannot play sports etc. It appears as if life’s choices have disappeared. By definition, suffering refers to the loss of sense of self, and indeed the person with persistent or chronic pain can feel such loss.

The existing understanding of pain has taken us a long way away from the biomedical model. The biopsychosocial model has gained some traction but the predominant approach continues to be driven by the search for an injury, a pathology or a structural explanation. For many years it has been known that pain and injury are not synonymous ~ the famous paper by Pat Wall was published in 1979:

“The period after injury is divided into the immediate, acute and chronic stages. In each stage it is shown that pain has only a weak connection to injury but a strong connection to the body state.

Pain features when we are in a state of protect in the face of a perceived threat. The intensity of the pain relates to this state and not to the extent of tissue damage. Pain and injury are fundamentally different and hence any explanation or treatment for pain based upon the thinking that a ‘structure’ or biomechanics is to blame is at odds with our understanding of pain. In fact, it is this misunderstanding that contributes significantly to chronic pain being the number one global health burden. This can and must change, which is the raison d’être for UP | understand pain.

~ understand pain to change pain

This being the case, this workshop will be a brief look at this enormous societal issue, a public health concern of vast importance considering the massive costs and immeasurable suffering. Not only will we review current thinking and understanding, we will consider the role of the GP and practices that can be readily used.

  • understand pain yourself
  • know your role
  • how can you help the person understand their pain?
  • setting the person on the right course: what is their vision of success?
  • practices you can choose to use in clinic

This overview is based on the Pain Coach Programme. The programme delivers results for people who make the decision to commit to practices that bring about change in a desired direction. They understand that we are designed to change and that we have great potential to be harnessed and used to overcome pain and live a meaningful life.

1:1 Pain Coach Mentoring: for clinicians who choose to pursue understanding pain to a greater level together with the practice of Pain Coaching.

RS